The Miskatonic Society

Travel Abroad, Lessons Learned

Notes of Dr. R. Stine, March 1921

My first trip abroad outside of Europe was eye-opening. I thought I would much prefer the comforts of home and our new State Highways. I am usually correct.
Since it was Dr. Armitage asking, I thought it was wise to come to the aid of a fellow man of medicine, especially being that I’m new to the group. I mean, after all, this is a fraternity society of fellows. We must all come to aid the other, as I saw happen in Indochine. But it wasn’t without difficulty.
Armitage stuck me with an unfortunate group of men and two women for the purpose of examining the local tribes for evidence of Voodan of some sort or another. He requested that, if found, occult activities should be documented and proof made, if possible.
Well, outside of some resistance from the French speaking police presence, the people we met were nice enough and helpful. This country is in bad need of a strong sales representative for Holy Smokes cigarettes, though one of the less premium labels would suit them well. We went in guise as archaeologists, though I don’t even think the local denizens even believed our fumbled attempt at a scholarly excavation. Damn, it was almost too hot for smoking.
Thought as fear of a boogie man, apparently a horned man calls together monkeys and, well, shadows, to do his bidding. Few lived to see the direct evidence, though a chief danced an interpretation of an encounter for us. They did show us the first evidence of occult activity, dismembered, bitten body parts.
As a man of Science and Medicine, I can say for certain that those human limbs and parts were not fresh, nor removed from the body through normal means.
We took a lead and followed a hot trail, only to end up harassed by almost possessed monkeys or small apes. Vile faces, they never attacked us once that I can recall, though the threat was very real.
Biff and Obie both seemed affected by a vision or song of what we believe to be the horned one – I nearly used my sedative to keep them down.
In the end, we held tight at a repurposed Buddha statue housed in a small temple or something. White, stone tablets inside allows some light research, photographs, etches and drawings. I think those pads were just the bit of evidence we needed, but were very instrumental in breaking away the attention of mean monkeys out there, we suppose. Moving them, we agreed at the time, may have cost us dearly. Well, we took photos, sketches and rubbings, enough that a scholar might be able to make sense of it all.
I, for one, am glad to be back home.
-Bye, folks.

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